Staying right in the middle of the oldest national park in Canada has its charm. That is if you’re away from busy streets and constant crowds. Camping in Banff National Park is a great option to enjoy nature to the fullest, and we’re sharing all our tips for your enjoyable stay.

Having lived in Banff and visiting the Canadian Rockies for the last 5 years has taught us a lot of valuable lessons about national parks, wildlife, backcountry and camping rules.

And while there’s a lot of information online saying you need to book a campsite 6 months in advance (which is not always true), that is very little in terms of last-minute camping or alternate campgrounds near Banff.

In this comprehensive guide, you’ll find:

  • a map of all campgrounds in Banff & beyond
  • a detailed breakdown of each reservable & first come first serve campsite in Banff National Park, including photos
  • other camping options when campgrounds in Banff are full
  • tips for reservations and last-minute camping (+secret free camping option)
  • important rules and safety tips for camping in the Rockies

Camping in Banff National Park - Cascade Ponds

Banff National Park has 14 campgrounds with over 2,400 sites (the majority of them are reservable).

While most of them are seasonal, open roughly from mid-May to mid-October, there is one campground in Banff and one in Lake Louise that is open year-round:

  • Tunnel Mountain Village II Campground in Banff
  • Lake Louise Trailer Campground

So if you’re visiting in winter for skiing, you can still camp in Banff.

The busiest season in Banff is July & August, which might be no surprise. What is a surprise to many people is that Banff is busy all year round. There are plenty of activities you can do in around Banff and therefore Banff is never a “ghost town”. Read more here: 100 things to do in Banff National Park & beyond.

If you’re arriving in Banff with RV/trailer and want to stay in town, you need to book in advance when registration opens in January. But if you’re flexible and don’t mind driving a bit further, there’s plenty of space in first come first serve campgrounds. And if you’re lucky, you might score a campsite in Banff last minute as well due to cancellations of other campers.

Most of the travellers using our Smile Campervans didn’t book in advance for the summer and had no problem finding an available campsite in Banff National Park.

If you like adventurous trips, book a Smile Campervan from us. It’s a budget-friendly option to see the Canadian Rockies.

Wapiti Campground in Canmore-6

Camping with Smile Campervan

Let’s break down all camping options you have when you visit Banff.

Map of campsites in Banff National Park

Green – First come first serve campgrounds
Blue – Reservable campgrounds
Orange – other options if all of the above is unavailable/full

All campgrounds on the map are accessible by car. The full breakdown of each is further below.

Camping in Banff National Park

Due to the unbelievable astronomic prices for hotels in Banff, many travellers rather go camping to keep their visit budget-friendly. It’s also our favourite option as you can move around the park without having to worry about returning to a hotel and rather stay by the river in a campsite and waking up with the immediate supply of fresh mountain air.

There are 3 different types of campgrounds in Jasper National Park:

  1. Reservable campgrounds – reserve here
  2. First come first serve campgrounds
  3. Backcountry campgrounds

TIP
Basic first-come-first-serve campgrounds cost 15,70 CAD – 21,50 CAD per night per campsite. Campgrounds with showers cost 27,40 CAD – 32,30 CAD per night per campsite.
Equipped campgrounds cost 70 CAD – 120 CAD per night per campsite.

Reservable campgrounds in Banff

The below 3 Tunnel Mountain Campgrounds are next to each other within walking distance from downtown Banff, or you can use a free shuttle bus to town. They all have a view of the Rundle Mountain.

Tunnel Mountain Village I Campground

Location: 5 km from downtown Banff

Operating dates: June 2019 – October 7

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water, outdoor theatre

Fees: 27,40 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 618

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-3

Popular nearby attractions: Hoodoos Viewpoint, Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Johnson Lake, Cascade Ponds, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes, Two Jack Lake, Lake Minnewanka

This is a very convenient location in Banff, it’s huge and located in the forest with a view of the Rundle Mountain. A nice feature is a Raven’s Nest Theatre where you can attend an evening program at 7:30 pm daily from June 22 to September 1.

Camping in Banff National Park - Hoodoos

View just across the road from Tunnel Mountain Campground

Tunnel Mountain Village II Campground

Location: 3 km from downtown Banff

Operating dates: year-round

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, cooking shelters, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water, outdoor theatre, equipped luxury campsites oTentik

Fees: 32,30 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 188

Popular nearby attractions: Hoodoos Viewpoint, Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Johnson Lake, Cascade Ponds, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes, Two Jack Lake, Lake Minnewanka

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-2

Outdoor theater with daily evening program

When coming from Banff, this is the first campground which is open for tents and RVs all year round. There’s a Wolf’s Den Theatre where you can attend an evening program at 7:30 pm daily from June 22 to September 1.

Another option in this campground is called oTentik (it’s like glamping).  Wooden structures with beds, electricity & heating and showers. They cost 120 CAD per night and are open May 9 – October 14.

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-4

luxury camping in oTentik in Banff

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-8

Tunnel Mountain Trailer Campground

Location: 3 km from downtown Banff

Operating dates: May 9 – October 7

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water

Fees: 38,20 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 321

Popular nearby attractions: Hoodoos Viewpoint, Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Johnson Lake, Cascade Ponds, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes, Two Jack Lake, Lake Minnewanka

This is a campground for the masses with trailers and RVs. Privacy between sites doesn’t exist as the sites are located along the road next to each other to fit as many as possible. If you’re travelling in our Smile Campervan (or not in a giant RV in general), I would suggest camping in Tunnel Mountain I or II.

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-7

Two Jack Main Campground

Location: 11 km from Banff

Operating dates: June 20 – September 2

Amenities: toilets, cooking shelters, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water, equipped tent campsites

Fees: 21,50 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 349

Popular nearby attractions: Two Jack Lake (obviously), Lake Minnewanka and a hiking/biking trail to Aylmer Lookout, Cascade Ponds, Johnson Lake, in Banff – Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes

Camping in Banff National Park - Two Jack Lakeside Campground-2

A popular campground given its distance to Two Jack Lake, Lake Minnewanka and Banff. It’s a walking distance to Two Jack Lake but located in the forest. Even though it doesn’t have showers, the beautiful surroundings make up for it.

They also have equipped campsites that include – 6 person tent, sleeping pads, stove & gas, and you’ll need to rent a sleeping bag in Banff. It costs 70 CAD, you can find more information on the Parks Canada website.

Camping in Banff National Park - Tunnel Mountain Campground-6

Cooking shelter

Two Jack Lakeside Campground

Location: 10 km from Banff

Operating dates: May 9 – October 7

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, cooking shelters, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water, equipped luxury campsites oTentik

Fees: 27,40 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 64

Popular nearby attractions: Two Jack Lake (obviously), Lake Minnewanka and a hiking/biking trail to Aylmer Lookout, Cascade Ponds, Johnson Lake, in Banff – Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes

Camping in Banff National Park - Two Jack Lakeside Campground-9

One of the most beautiful campgrounds in Banff National Park located by the famous Two Jack Lake. Two Jack Lake is usually a calm lake, great for stand up paddle boarding but might be too cold for a swim for most people. If you want to book a campsite in advance, make it this one. It’s close to Banff but still secluded to enjoy the quietness while being surrounded by mountains.

Another option of staying here would be glamping – staying in oTentik equipped sites featuring wooden structures with beds, electricity & heating and showers. They cost 120 CAD per night and are open May 9 – October 7. You can find more information on the Parks Canada website.

There’s a bus stop along the main road with shuttles to Lake Minnewanka or Banff.

Camping in Banff National Park - Two Jack Lakeside Campground-3

Johnston Canyon Campground

Location: 24 km from Banff along Bow Valley Parkway

Operating dates: closed in 2019 for construction, opening spring 2020

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, cooking shelters, hook-ups, dump station, drinking water

Fees: N/A

Number of sites: 132

Popular nearby attractions: Johnston Canyon hike to Ink Pots, Rockbound Lake hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes, Mt. Norquay, in Banff – Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail

It’s located just across the road from a very popular attraction so if you’re camping here, you don’t have to worry about finding parking. And even if you’re not camping here, I suggest you drive the Bow Valley Parkway early in the morning or around sunset when you can see the most wildlife.

An epic travel guide to the Canadian Rockies

Johnston Canyon Lower Falls

Lake Louise (Trailer + Tent) Campground

Location: 58 km northwest of Banff

Operating dates: year-round for trailers and May 30 – September 30 for tents

Amenities: hot showers, toilets, drinking water, hook-ups & dump station for trailers

Fees: 27,40 CAD for tents and 32,30 CAD for trailers per night per campsite

Number of sites: 189 for trailers and 206 for tents

Popular nearby attractions: Lake Louise (obviously) and surrounding hiking trails (I suggest Mt Saint Piran), Moraine Lake and surrounding hiking trails, Lake Louise ski resort with gondola operating in summer, Herbert Lake, Hector Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake

Lake Louise Campground is located 4 km from the lake which gives you a huge advantage of visiting the lake without driving. Parking is hard to come by at both Lake Louise and Moraine Lake in summer, unless you arrive at 6 am or late in the evening.

Banff hikes - 20 best hikes in Banff National Park, Canada - Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Rampart Creek Campground

Location: 148 km from Banff & 92 km from Lake Louise along Icefields Parkway

Operating dates: May 31 – October 14, reservations needed June 19 – September 29

Amenities: outhouse, no picnic shelters

Fees: 17,60 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 50

Popular nearby attractions: south of Rampart Creek – Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, Glacier Lake hiking trail, Chephren Lake hiking trail; north of Rampart Creek – Weeping Wall, Parker Ridge Hike, Wilcox Pass Hike, Columbia Icefield (these last 2 already belong to Jasper National Park)

A very basic campground with almost no amenities but it rather serves as a good option to stay when travelling along the scenic Icefields Parkway between Lake Louise and Jasper.

Icefields Parkway scenic road from Lake Louise to Jasper

Icefields Parkway scenic road from Lake Louise to Jasper

First come first serve campgrounds in Banff

  • You will self-register at the kiosk when you arrive and find an available site.
  • Camping fee (and optional fire permit) is payable either by cash (you need to have the exact change) or you can fill out the paper slip with your credit card info.
  • Every campground has fire rings with firewood, picnic tables at each site, and drinking water. Outhouses are well maintained with toilet paper and hand sanitizer.
  • Check out is at 11 am and I recommend arriving before that to get a site. You can still leave and explore for the day as long as you paid for the site and your paper slip is attached to the wooden pole in front of each site (so others know it’s been taken).

TIP
All first come first serve campgrounds are basic without showers. You can shower at the Fenland Recreation Centre, Banff Upper Hot Springs (for daily admission fee 8,30 CAD), or Banff Centre (only 5,50 CAD if you visit during public swim hours.

Castle Mountain Campground

Location: 33 km from Banff along Bow Valley Parkway

Operating dates: May 30 – September 16

Amenities: washrooms with hot running water, flush toilets, drinking water, picnic shelters

Fees: 21,50 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 43

Popular nearby attractions: Johnston Canyon hike to Ink Pots, Rockbound Lake hiking trail, Vermilion Lakes, Mt. Norquay, in Banff – Bow Falls, Cascade Gardens, Legacy biking trail, Tunnel Mountain hiking trail, Banff Upper Hot Springs, Sulphur Mountain hiking trail

A nice campground with a lot of popular attractions nearby. Visit Moraine Lake and Lake Louise and drive the Bow Valley Parkway in the evening for a chance to spot wildlife.

There is a bus stop along the Bow Valley Parkway with a shuttle bus to Lake Louise or Banff.

Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park

Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park

Protection Mountain Campground

Location: 44 km from Banff along Bow Valley Parkway

Operating dates: June 21 – September 2

Amenities: washrooms with hot running water, flush toilets, drinking water, picnic shelters

Fees: 21,50 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 72

Popular nearby attractions: Johnston Canyon hike to Ink Pots, Rockbound Lake hiking trail, Lake Louise and surrounding hiking trails (I suggest Mt Saint Piran), Moraine Lake and surrounding hiking trails, Lake Louise ski resort with gondola operating in summer, Herbert Lake, Hector Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake

Another nice campground along the scenic Bow Valley Parkway. It’s also a good strategic location for 2 days if you want to visit both Banff and Lake Louise. There is a bus stop along the Bow Valley Parkway with a shuttle bus to Lake Louise or Banff.

Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park

Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park

Mosquito Creek Campground

Location: 83 km from Banff & 27 km north of Lake Louise along Icefields Parkway

Operating dates: May 31 – October 14

Amenities: outhouse, drinking water, picnic shelter

Fees: 17,60 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 32

Popular nearby attractions: Hector Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake, Lake Louise, Moraine Lake

Located under the peaks of the Rockies, Mosquito Creek Campground has camping spots by the creek with beautiful views.

Camping in Banff National Park - Mosquito Creek Campground-3

Mosquito Creek Campground

Camping in Banff National Park - Mosquito Creek Campground-4

Camping with Smile Campervan

Silverhorn Creek Campground

Location: 111 km from Banff & 56 km north of Lake Louise along Icefields Parkway

Operating dates: June 15 – September 30

Amenities: outhouse, picnic shelter

Fees: 15,70 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 45

Popular nearby attractions: Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, Glacier Lake hiking trail, Chephren Lake hiking trail, Weeping Wall, Parker Ridge Hike, Wilcox Pass Hike, Columbia Icefield (these last 2 already belong to Jasper National Park)

A scenic location and a quiet campground, that is what campers need I believe. Even though it’s a very basic campground, the views along the creek are amazing.

100 best things to do in Banff National Park, Canada - Visit the insanely blue Peyto Lake

Peyto Lake, Banff National Park

Waterfowl Lakes Campground

Location: 116 km from Banff & 60 km north of Lake Louise along Icefields Parkway

Operating dates: June 21 – September 3

Amenities: washroom with hot running water & flush toilet, outhouses, drinking water, picnic shelters, outdoor theatre

Fees: 21,50 CAD per night per campsite

Number of sites: 116

Popular nearby attractions: Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, Glacier Lake hiking trail, Chephren Lake hiking trail, Cirque Lake hiking trail

One of the most scenic campgrounds along Icefields Parkway. The sites are spacious and mostly in the forest. There are picnic tables and benches on the shore of Waterfowl Lakes and also hike to Chephren Lake (with a view of Mount Chephren) and Cirque Lake (with a glacier view) start from here.

TIP
There are even more first come first serve campgrounds on Icefields Parkway when you continue north to Jasper. You can see more info and pictures in our guide about camping in Jasper National Park.

Camping in Banff National Park - Waterfowl Lakes Campground

Waterfowl Lakes Campground

Backcountry campgrounds in Banff

Banff National Park offers numerous backcountry trails. The most popular trekking routes are:

  • Lake Minnewanka to Aylmer Lookout
  • Glacier Lake
  • Egypt Lake
  • Mount Assiniboine

For campground details and a map, download brochure Backcountry Trails in Banff National Park. For some routes, you can also stay in a shelter.

cofCamping in Banff National Park

Backcountry camping in Banff National Park

What you will need is to purchase a backcountry permit for 9,80 CAD per night online or in the Visitor Centre (a bit more if reserved by phone). If you’re planning one of the above-mentioned treks, book your campground as early as possible because they go fast. The reservation opens in late January and most of the campgrounds for the summer weekends are booked that day.

Many of the backcountry campgrounds are maintained which means they will have food storage cables or bear poles where you need to store all your food so it doesn’t attract wildlife.

You can find more information about backcountry camping on the Parks Canada website.

Camping in Banff National Park - backcountry shelter

Backcountry shelter in Banff National Park

Other options when campgrounds in Banff are full

If you find out shortly before you arrive in Banff that all campgrounds are fully booked, don’t worry. There’s still plenty of space to be found. One option is to visit the campgrounds early in the morning (registration booths open at 8 am) and ask if they have availability. Some travellers cancel their sites last minute or leave earlier than planned and you can get their spot.

If that doesn’t work, here are all the options outside of official campgrounds in Banff National Park where you can camp as well:

Camping in overflow

Lake Louise Overflow – vehicles only

Location: 51 km northwest of Banff

Amenities: outhouse

Fees: 10,80 CAD per night per vehicle

Popular nearby attractions: Lake Louise (obviously) and surrounding hiking trails (I suggest Mt Saint Piran), Moraine Lake and surrounding hiking trails, Lake Louise ski resort with gondola operating in summer, Herbert Lake, Hector Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake

Camping in Banff National Park

Lake Louise overflow

If you’re driving from Banff, Lake Louise Overflow Parking is about 6 km before you reach Lake Louise. It is clearly signed on the Trans-Canada Highway. Lake Louise Overflow is a big parking lot for vehicles only and it’s located right next to the overflow parking lot for Lake Louise shuttles.

Because of its location and low price, it fills up fast with big RVs. Smaller cars (such as our Smile Campervan) should be still able to find a spot for the night.

Camping in Canmore

Mountain town of Canmore is located only 25 km from Banff, just outside the national park boundary. It is less crowded than Banff and accommodation is generally cheaper. Enjoy the Canmore to the fullest with our post of 20 fun outdoor things to do.

Free option – overnight RV/campervan parking area near downtown located along the railway tracks behind Save on Foods. There is an outhouse and you have to leave early in the morning as parking is not allowed between 7am-9am (situation as of summer 2019).

Paid campgrounds:

  • Wapiti Campground – it’s right next to the Travel Alberta Information Centre in Canmore and all tent sites & RV sites are first come first serve. You can arrive any time and self-register at the kiosk: fee for a tent site is 27 CAD per night per campsite and fee for powered RV sites is 37 CAD. The campground has hot running water, flushable toilets, drinking water, and hot showers (3 CAD per 1 shower token). Free Wi-Fi is available at the Information Centre. Even though it’s close to the highway, we enjoyed the mountain views all around us.
  • Bow River Campground – is a reservable campground with 7 unserviced sites (28 CAD + reservation fee 12 CAD) and 59 power+water sites (40 CAD + reservation fee 12 CAD). You can reserve a site here.
  • Three Sisters Campground – first come first serve campground located 12 km east of Canmore on Highway 1. There are 36 sites for both RVs and tents for 26 CAD per night per campsite.
Wapiti Campground in Canmore

Wapiti Campground in Canmore

TIP
If you’re staying in Canmore or Banff in a campground without showers, you can shower in Canmore at Elevation Place (for the daily admission fee to the pool 8 CAD) or in Daylodge at Nordic Centre.

Even if you’re visiting Banff National Park, you can stay at neighbouring national parks Kootenay and Yoho. Campgrounds are a short driving distance away and offer beautiful surroundings.

Camping in Kootenay National Park

  • Marble Canyon Campground – both reservable and first come first serve sites are available. It’s open June 20 to September 9 and camping fee is 21,50 CAD.

Camping in Yoho National Park

  • Kicking Horse Campground – both reservable and first come first serve sites are available. This scenic campground offers sites by the river, in the forest or on a meadow. Campsite fee is 27,40 CAD and includes hot showers and flush toilets.
  • Monarch Campground – both reservable and first come first serve sites are available. It’s a basic campground for a fee 17,60 CAD.
  • Takakkaw Falls Campground – walk-in campsite with a view of the 2nd tallest waterfall in Canada.
100 best things to do in Banff National Park, Canada - Spot rainbow under Takakkaw Falls

Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park

TIP
Popular attractions in Yoho – Natural Bridge, Takakkaw Falls & Emerald Lake. Emerald Lake offers the most budget-friendly canoeing in the Rockies for 70 CAD/hour per canoe.

Explore Yoho National Park with our comprehensive guide – Adventure travel guide to Yoho National Park

Camping tips & rules for Banff

Camping in the Rockies is very different from what you might have experienced before. There are lots of bears and other wildlife. I’m sure you will see some during your trip but with wildlife come rules to keep them and you safe.

Wildlife

Wild animals are everywhere. When you are visiting the Rockies, you’re in a bear country. There’s no fence around campgrounds and wildlife likes to wander around, most commonly elk, deer and bears.

Look around wherever you go in the campground and stay bear aware. This is not to scare you but to make your visit as safe as possible. Bears are generally scared and run away but they don’t like to be surprised.

Feeding wildlife or approaching them for selfies is strictly prohibited. Unfortunately, this happens more often than you might think. Park rangers are on patrol and can fine you up to 25,000 CAD.

Wildlife in Canada - bear

Bare campsite

This is the most important rule of all. All food, food-related items (grills & dishes), and anything that has a scent might attract bears into your site. You should never leave any of these items unattended for even a minute.

Everything must be stored inside your vehicle or in bear-proof storage lockers that every campground provides.

Download this brochure from Parks Canada for more info.

Camping in Banff National Park - Two Jack Lakeside Campground-4

Bare campsite = no food left around

Permits

Park Pass

To visit any national park in Canada, you are required to purchase a Park Pass (daily or yearly).

  • 9.80 CAD per person for a daily pass, 19.60 CAD for a group/family
  • 67.70 CAD per person for a yearly pass, 136.40 CAD for a group/family

The yearly pass is valid for all National Parks in Canada. You can either purchase it at the gate when you enter the national park, in Visitor’s Centre or online here.

Camping

Fees for camping range from 15,70 CAD for a basic first come first serve campground to 32,30 CAD for a campsite with electrical hook up.

While camping fees for the first come first serve campgrounds are payable at the self-registration kiosk, reservable campgrounds can be paid in advance when booking online or at the gate to the campground directly to Parks Canada staff (cash or card).

Fire permit

If there’s no fire ban in place, you can have a campfire at your site when you purchase a fire permit for 8,80 CAD. You can only use the firewood provided. Even though we’re used to just gather dead wood from the ground for campfires, this is not allowed in National Parks.

Wild/random camping

Wild camping is not allowed in any National Park, only in campgrounds. You can, however, wild camp for free on public land, review the rules here for Alberta. British Columbia has more options for free camping in Provincial Parks and Recreational Sites. You can use this website to find them.

Wild camping in British Columbia

Wild camping in British Columbia

Campsite reservations

The most popular campgrounds – Tunnel Mountain Campgrounds in Banff and Two Jack Campgrounds close to Banff need to be booked in advance for the summer. Reservations for summer 2019 opened January 8th at 8 am, and most sites were booked within minutes, especially for long weekends in Canada.

Additional reading about Canadian Rockies

Day hikes in Banff National Park:

For amazing bike trips in the Rockies, read these:

Hikes in Canmore & Kananaskis

More hiking ideas:

Plan your trip to the Rockies:


Do you have any questions about camping in Banff? Let us know in the comments below.


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About Maya Steiningerova

Heyo, I’m Maya! An adventure athlete currently living near the Canadian Rockies with my partner in crime Michal. I love running in the mountains, jumping in the ice cold lakes, mountain biking and trying not so common activities, such as mountaineering. By showing that an ordinary person can live an extraordinary life, my hope is to inspire you to live an adventurous life and provide you with tips and tools for your own adventure.